Doug Vining Paying for the intelligent web

When everything is connected, and the drones, sensors, cameras and other devices are talking to one another, intelligently, and providing useful real-time feedback to a number of people, communities and businesses, who pays for the computing power, bandwidth and ultimately electric power that these things need to keep functioning?
If there's central control determining the allocation of resources, that will undermine the 'democratic' nature of the emergent intelligence capabilities of such a network. Machines can compete for resources, based on their usefulness in the network, but ideally there would be an automated trading system for all users to support the network.
Enter Ether, a blockchain technology for trading or bartering computer cycles. Such a platform could also be used for trading bandwidth and energy, and develop an entirely automated business model that allows the Internet of Things to pay for itself.
Ether could also power the energy internet. As semi-redundant computing power (idle computers) becomes more ubiquitous, the only real cost involved is the energy to keep them powered up. Likewise energy demand and surpluses on an energy internet would be more efficiently shared if there was an automated, trusted ...
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Paying for the intelligent web") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=52ca6ae2-212e-4309-8af3-c9901bbbb4ee
Posted: 25 May 2015 at 10:39

Doug Vining Intelligent things

When the internet of things meets artificial intelligence, will the result be a bug-ridden mess, or the kind of useful ecosystem we wrote about in this MindBullet? The jury is out at this stage!
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Posted: 27 July 2015 at 17:15

Doug Vining Google instant translate

I don't often rave about apps for the smartphone, but this one is great! Google Translate now uses augmented reality to instantly translate signs and words in a foreign language, without having to link to a server. Yesterday I happened to be buying some Port with a Portuguese-only label, and Google Translate let me confirm what I thought it was saying. Brilliant!

This is one of those apps that brings intelligence to the edge of the network, into the mobile device, providing real-time utility. That's the kind of development that will lead to 'Emergent Intelligence' as we described it in this MindBullet - a web of democratic devices.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Google instant translate") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=2dc5132c-e1aa-4313-833e-aa8327c3ea04
Posted: 4 August 2015 at 12:03

Anton Musgrave Can the old device companies 'eat themselves' and create their own worst nightmare...and own it?

History is littered with examples of companies too scared to cannibalise their existing products or services for fear of slowing revenues but in the end result become totally irrelevant. Will Apple, Google and Microsoft fall to a similar fate as hand held devices die as services embedded in objects (fuelled by the Internet of Things, take over?
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Can the old device companies 'eat themselves' and create their own worst nightmare...and own it?") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=532141bb-142d-4d7e-9c33-7b192a2b9584
Posted: 24 March 2016 at 18:09

Doug Vining Emergent AI needs a concierge

I love it when our MindBullets scenarios start taking shape in present day events! Just look at this new technology for co-ordinating the many smart devices populating your life:

"Thington is a ‘concierge’?—?a sort of domestic AI on your phone—that communicates with you in everyday language. It brings together all your devices in one place and helps you get the most out of them. And it does this in a few really simple and fun ways."
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Emergent AI needs a concierge") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=bc988b99-c036-4645-bcdb-c44798fb3282
Posted: 8 April 2016 at 13:45

Doug Vining Holland's things get connected, nationwide

"As from today the KPN LoRa network is available throughout The Netherlands," KPN said in a statement. "This makes The Netherlands the first country in the world to have a nationwide LoRa network for Internet of Things (IoT) application."

In the initial phase, the network was rolled out in Rotterdam and The Hague in November. But it was stepped up across the country due to "substantial customer interest", said KPN.

KPN has already reached deals to connect some 1.5 million objects, a number which should steadily grow now that the LoRa network is available across the country.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Holland's things get connected, nationwide") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=a74f8c34-6f30-4dae-b46c-50c29f3dd530
Posted: 30 June 2016 at 17:36

Anton Musgrave Fascinating questions on where AI might take corporations!

As AI developed and mutates, it will no doubt learn and self evolve. This might introduce really interesting questions around how it will take corporate decisions like allocation of resources and payment of profits!
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Posted: 8 August 2016 at 18:49

Doug Vining Understanding artificial intelligence

I think it's fair to say that most of us are fascinated by artificial intelligence, but we don't understand it. The idea of smart machines, that don't only understand natural language, but think like humans (if that's possible) conjures up all sorts of scenarios for the future. But even developers of advanced algorithms and deep neural networks can't explain exactly how they work, or rather why they work in a particular way. It's a bit of a black box, where we can only see the result, and not all the loops in the process. Here's an instructive article that looks at four types of AI, and what sort of developments are required to achieve them. If it seems impossible to reach the final stage, remember that we live in an exponential world, where the impossible today will be the routine reality of tomorrow!
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Understanding artificial intelligence") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=ac6e9efe-45c1-4589-beed-86fdf2954db6
Posted: 15 November 2016 at 13:40

Anton Musgrave Future of corporate structures and models?

Chris Skinner has opened a great debate - what does the future corporate structure need to be...what can it be...what should it be? With IoT showing that power moves to the fringe and kills the cloud, communication models enabling instant global impacts, we have to ask the big questions!
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Future of corporate structures and models?") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=684f7039-3029-4619-8365-9ebe00e6c628
Posted: 23 September 2017 at 15:52
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