Doug Vining China's grand plan for cities

China's latest urbanization policy has strong environmental overtones.

According to Xinhua, the plan says China should strive to push for "harmonious and pleasant living conditions in cities by making basic public services accessible to all permanent urbanites and pursuing better ecology, more clean air and safe drinking water."

China's ultimate ambition is to have a population that mirrors the developed economies, 80% urban and 20% rural, and they are determined to get there. In the past this has created some of the most polluted cities in the world, but now it seems they are counting the cost of pollution and environmental degradation and equally determined to counter it.

One of their projects is considering the use of drones to clean up the air above cities like Beijing and Shanghai by spraying smog with chemicals that will precipitate the particles down to the ground. The problem then becomes cleaning the streets, but at least people won't have to breathe it. Obviously China is not shy to use the latest technology to help them with their grand plans!
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Posted: 27 March 2014 at 07:53

Doug Vining Cleaning up the kingdom

China declares war on pollution:

"Over the past year, the Chinese government has begun to emphasise environmental protection in its official rhetoric. The new law 'sets environmental protection as the country’s basic policy,' state news agency Xinhua reported.

At an annual parliamentary meeting in March, premier Li Keqiang said that the government will 'resolutely declare war against pollution as we declared war against poverty'."
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Cleaning up the kingdom") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=97271bd0-7fd7-4940-9212-30b4d3decd26
Posted: 7 May 2014 at 10:05

Doug Vining The Xiaomi generation

There's a new brand set to dominate the consumer tech space in China, and that's Xiaomi. They're becoming the trendiest smartphone maker and soon the internet of things for their adoring fans, and that's the secret to their success.

"There is a younger generation, though, the Xiaomi generation, that has grown up in a country that has been growing by near double digits every year they have been alive. To their minds of course China is a global power, and why wouldn’t they embrace Chinese brands?"
A FuturesForum post (titled: "The Xiaomi generation") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=031aea1b-8818-4441-8cbc-cfd3cb065b24
Posted: 13 January 2015 at 09:00

Neil Jacobsohn Chinese banks top the world's biggest company list

So which are the biggest companies in the world? Forbes has just released its annual survey of the world's biggest public corporations in 2015. And the top three spots are all taken by Chinese banks. How the world has changed! Our MindBullet from 2014 may just be on the money!
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Chinese banks top the world's biggest company list") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=7c5f365b-c92a-4509-8004-e9e1aed43011
Posted: 26 May 2016 at 16:08

Doug Vining Chinese banks top the world's biggest company list

Interesting that the top 7 are all banking and investment companies. Then come Apple, Exxon Mobil, and Toyota - Tech, Oil and Autos. I wonder how that might change in the next decade? I'm sure it will.
Posted: 26 May 2016 at 17:10

Doug Vining China the come-back kid

Over the years, we have published many MindBullets on China's rise, and possible fall. We don't predict the future, merely highlight various scenarios. In China's case, it can go both ways; China could reign supreme, despite its many challenges, or it could succumb to a number of drivers, like commodity bubbles, property bubbles, worker discontent, inflation, population ageing, global contraction, and more.

What all these uncertainties point out, is that China may be overtaking America in terms of Purchasing Power Parity economics, but it's still a long way from being the only super-power in absolute terms. Whether it will ever achieve that status remains to be seen. But never say never...
A FuturesForum post (titled: "China the come-back kid") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=e2746ede-d5b5-43f7-9efa-fe80da3fefc3
Posted: 29 December 2016 at 18:47
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