Doug Vining Creative computers

Can computers be creative? IBM seems to think so. If you can teach a computer like Watson to reason and make deductions, based on what it already knows, then maybe you can teach it to make new stuff based on stuff it's already familiar with.

Is that creativity? IBM says "Yes"!
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Creative computers") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=04c507c5-3919-4b6e-82cb-6c04245c4f95
Posted: 12 November 2013 at 10:07

Doug Vining Human vs Machine

On top of IBM's Watson cognitive system being tested as an advisor to executives comes the news that Elon Musk is hyping super AI as "dangerous." Any advanced technology can be dangerous in the wrong hands, but is it the cynic in me thinking he may just be generating publicity for his recent investment in Vicarious?
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Human vs Machine") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=7d8ade44-9d50-4780-a631-a82f4dc39866
Posted: 4 August 2014 at 11:51

Doug Vining Robopocalypse now, soon or never?

Forget about the zombie apocalypse, the robots are going to be the real enemy. That's the message from trend watchers and futurists. Even technohero Elon Musk is warning of the nuclear winter that will result from Super AI. And there's a clue to the big issue, because the bots that will really make 2 billion jobs redundant, as suggested by Thomas Frey, are software agents and algorithms, not lumbering mechanical men.

Making predictions about the future is a risky business. We prefer to sketch scenarios that pose the "What if?" questions, and fuel the debate about what may or may not materialize. Will people be the victims of a robopocalypse? I don't think so, but it's possible. Check out some of our far-sighted MindBullets on this meme.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Robopocalypse now, soon or never?") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=e8aada24-83ad-4c69-b8a0-d616485cb760
Posted: 19 August 2014 at 19:40

Doug Vining Robopocalypse now, soon or never?

MIT professor David Autor says "It Will Be A Long Time Before Robots Take Jobs That Require Things Like Adaptability And Common Sense" in a paper reported by Reuters.

"Autor, who has been studying technology and its impact on jobs since before the dot-com bubble burst, notes that some economists have pointed to the weak U.S. labour market since the 2000s as evidence of the adverse impact of computerization.

Such modern-day Luddites are mistaken, he suggested. U.S. investment in computers, which had been increasing strongly, dropped just as labour demand also fell, exactly the opposite of what ought to happen if technology is replacing labour.

More likely, he said, globalization is to blame, hurting demand for domestic labour and, like technology, helping to reshape the labour landscape. While in the long run both globalization and technology should in theory benefit the economy, he wrote, their effects are “frequently slow, costly, and disruptive.”

http://www.businessinsider.com.au/r-computers-reshaping-global-job-market-for-better-and-worse-paper-2014-8
Posted: 1 September 2014 at 08:49

Doug Vining Robopocalypse now, soon or never?

In this opinion piece futurist Thomas Frey offers six megatrends that will shape the future of employment, and asks "When It Comes to Jobs, Why Is This Time Different?"

http://www.wfs.org/blogs/thomas-frey/when-it-comes-jobs-why-time-different

Posted: 11 September 2014 at 12:02

Doug Vining Why everything's getting AI

"Everything that we formerly electrified we will now cognitize. This new utilitarian AI will also augment us individually as people (deepening our memory, speeding our recognition) and collectively as a species. There is almost nothing we can think of that cannot be made new, different, or interesting by infusing it with some extra IQ. In fact, the business plans of the next 10,000 startups are easy to forecast: Take X and add AI. This is a big deal, and now it's here."

According to the article, three things are making this possible:
1. Cheaper parallel processors
2. Big Data
3. Better algorithms
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Why everything's getting AI") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=263d16d0-7e9e-4965-b77e-4eb5b3ec1f5f
Posted: 30 October 2014 at 16:18

Doug Vining Why we fear AI

“We humans steer the future not because we’re the strongest beings on the planet, or the fastest, but because we are the smartest,” said James Barrat, author of “Our Final Invention: Artificial Intelligence and the End of the Human Era.” “So when there is something smarter than us on the planet, it will rule over us on the planet.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/06/fashion/artificial-intelligence-as-a-threat.html
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Why we fear AI") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=a7381f3e-d489-4ea1-b1b2-b34260ccaacf
Posted: 12 November 2014 at 16:45

Doug Vining Scared of smart bots

Stephen Hawking is afraid of super intelligent computers.

Hawking told the BBC: “The primitive forms of artificial intelligence we already have, have proved very useful. But I think the development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race.”
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Scared of smart bots") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=50034fe3-75f6-4a85-8b48-f8d49ad04007
Posted: 3 December 2014 at 12:31

Doug Vining Exponential neural network

Does Moore's Law govern neural networks too? If so, we might reach general super machine intelligence faster than we thought!
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Exponential neural network") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=6d29e1c2-82c8-48d5-a818-c86cba7c5474
Posted: 7 August 2015 at 09:33

Doug Vining Busting the myths of AI

Here's a long but interesting read - how much of what we think we know about AI is based on myth, movies and make-believe?

Decide for yourself. And then ask Watson if you're right!
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Busting the myths of AI") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=b91aa284-d5e2-45bb-a353-f8c689e6fc15
Posted: 16 March 2016 at 17:47

Doug Vining Computers that think like people

A while ago we published this MindBullet about cognitive systems, computers that think, and behave, like people do. Now IBM has advanced the progress towards these systems with the first artificial neurons that operate like those in our brains.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Computers that think like people") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=1e317d03-a03b-4954-bce1-9c6b89a6dabc
Posted: 4 August 2016 at 11:35

Doug Vining How to steal an AI

How do you steal someone else's deep learning algorithm that has been built up from thousands, perhaps millions of data inputs? Apparently all you need to do is build a machine learning system that quizzes the target AI often enough and voila! you can replicate it.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "How to steal an AI") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=d7f8b61a-5a55-4002-9bd1-c14333878343
Posted: 4 October 2016 at 10:40

Doug Vining Artificially intelligent art

Paintings created by an AI system have received the thumbs up from the public.

"The idea is to make art that is “novel, but not too novel”, says Marian Mazzone, an art historian at the College of Charleston in South Carolina, who worked on the system.

Mazzone and her colleagues at Rutgers University in New Jersey and Facebook’s AI lab in California modified what’s known as a generative adversarial network (GAN), pitting two neural nets against each other to get better and better outcomes. The general idea is that one of them creates a solution, the other judges it – and the algorithm loops until it attains the desired result.

The team built a generator network that devised images to be scrutinised by a discriminator network, which had learned from analysing 81,500 paintings to distinguish between images we would class as artworks and those we wouldn’t – such as a photo or diagram. The discriminator had also learned to distinguish between styles of art, such as rococo or cubism."
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Artificially intelligent art") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=edfa869a-6742-4f03-ab8b-a1c6b1a404f8
Posted: 7 July 2017 at 09:11

Doug Vining AI's winning ways



A FuturesForum post (titled: "AI's winning ways") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=a01c451f-8299-42ff-8109-2acb2ba99b83
Posted: 20 August 2018 at 11:59
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