Neil Jacobsohn Cold fusion

One of FutureWorld's associates, energy economist Jeremy Wakeford, has just published this article in Engineering News on Rossi's progress. Read on!
http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/article/interest-in-lenr-device-resurges-as-independent-report-is-released-2013-06-07
Posted: 13 June 2013 at 08:44

Doug Vining Cold fusion takeover

This cold fusion device has been called dubious and unproven. But now a US venture capital company has acquired it with the aim of developing the technology and making it widely available.

Will it work? If it does, it will change everything.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Cold fusion takeover") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=055a1c54-bdd3-4bb1-8b69-02855a2c21ce
Posted: 5 February 2014 at 16:24

Doug Vining Fusion's future

This nuclear fusion startup isn't trying to recreate cold fusion experiments. Instead they think that their reactor engine can create hot fusion in one-second cycles, generating a net gain of electric current. The problem with fusion energy, it's always a decade away, even in a decade. I think cheap solar will beat fusion power in the next decade, but who knows?

"At the scale they’re designing for, the team thinks that it will have significant price advantages once they go to market. Their design collects charged particles with each pulse, meaning it can generate electricity without having to construct a pricey turbine in addition to the reactor. The reactor is fueled by deuterium, an isotope of hydrogen that is abundant in sea water, making it more affordable than truckloads of diesel."
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Fusion's future") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=329f669e-8ad5-47cb-920f-84dacefd9de9
Posted: 15 August 2014 at 10:13

Doug Vining Portable nuclear power

No this invention is not cold fusion, or even warm fusion. Rather it is a nuclear power cell, described as a water-based battery. Perhaps it should be called a fuel cell, as the radioactive material presumably gets used up. It's also unclear whether this device can be recharged and discharged, or if it's a one-time use. My guess is that it would be fairly expensive to use in place of a rechargeable lithium battery in a car, but for specialised applications could prove superior.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Portable nuclear power") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=3b12497d-379e-4e2d-aedc-803d8ae64b7b
Posted: 17 September 2014 at 13:26

Neil Jacobsohn Nuclear fusion a reality?

We've written a lot on these pages over the years about the dream of nuclear fusion - clean, fast nuclear energy. Could it actually be happening? The sceptics remain, but it seems unlikely that a company of the stature of Lockheed Martin would make lose claims. The energy market just got more exciting!
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Nuclear fusion a reality?") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=88cf14ff-3241-41fc-bcfd-b67531029661
Posted: 30 October 2014 at 12:02
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