Doug Vining Scarcity and Abundance: Are there limits to growth?

There appears to be a battle brewing in the global debate about the future; the future of society, business, and humanity, and the future of the world. We might call this a war of ideas, between the techno-utopians and the neo-Malthusians, a struggle for web-space and YouTube time between the rational optimists and the sustainability alarmists.

One the one hand, we have very real concerns with a rising population and increasingly exploited basic resources, reflected in the current 'super-cycle' of commodity prices. On the other, we have potentially limitless scientific and technological innovation to solve most, if not all the challenges that approach us. Plus we have the balancing forces of the market, allocating resources to those who have the means, and the efficiencies to serve the demand.

There is also the rising trend to better standards of living and reduction in poverty, something which happens naturally in a society where people are free to better themselves. But the recent excesses of ...
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Scarcity and Abundance: Are there limits to growth?") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=ef4dda0b-8aab-44e5-88b4-a4c3423dae17
Posted: 10 April 2012 at 09:18

Doug Vining Scarcity and Abundance: Are there limits to growth?

The neo-Malthusians are far from silent. This report from the Royal Society sounds the klaxons of alarm, calling for 'cuts' in consumption and population: http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/apr/26/earth-population-consumption-disasters

It is interesting that they don't consider a world of abundance a future possibility at all. Paul Ehrlich, in particular, says we face 'catastrophic or slow motion' disasters unless population is brought under control and resources redistributed.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/apr/26/world-population-resources-paul-ehrlich?
Posted: 26 April 2012 at 14:32

Doug Vining Scarcity and Abundance: Are there limits to growth?

The Economist, in its typical sanguine style, reflects that the report from the Royal Society, like the curate's egg, is good in parts. But on the whole it stinks.
http://www.economist.com/blogs/newsbook/2012/04/population-and-growth?fsrc=nlw|newe|4-30-2012|1581000|36066637|
Posted: 1 May 2012 at 20:19

Neil Jacobsohn Towards a circular economy in food

Danone has not always been seen as the most environmentally-friendly company in the world - but this McKinsey interview with its CEO on a circular economy in food is impressive. Of course, we argue in Future World that 'sustainability' is a yesterday concept. Instead of being sustainable, we should strive to thrive!
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Towards a circular economy in food") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=0cd82a65-20ef-4baa-8d23-5977444b0aca
Posted: 6 June 2016 at 12:38
Comments by users of MindBullets are those of the authors and are not necessarily shared, endorsed and/or warranted by FutureWorld. All MindBullet content is Copyright FutureWorld International © 2019. All Rights Reserved.