Doug Vining Empty bowls, stomachs and pockets

Even though world rice production has almost doubled over the last 30 years, it's not enough for Asia's growth. Recent shortages have caused 'soaring prices' especially in the Philippines. The Economist says this has ramifications for political stability too:
http://www.economist.com/daily/news/displaystory.cfm?story_id=10910906&fsrc=nwl
Can China step up to this challenge?
Posted: 27 March 2008 at 06:48

Wolfgang Grulke "Change in farming can feed world"

The Guardian article on this topic 16 April 2008: http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/apr/16/food.biofuels
Posted: 17 April 2008 at 18:05

Doug Vining No food shortage in China

I met some representatives from Shanghai this week who were adamant that there was no food shortage in China at present. They have sufficient for their needs. On the other hand, the export of rice is forbidden, and the price is controlled by the state.
Posted: 20 June 2008 at 13:43

Doug Vining Hidden Battle for the World Food System

"What they found was really interesting. They said that industrial agriculture will not feed the planet. Genetically modified agriculture will not feed the planet. What will feed everyone is sustainable agriculture based on agro-ecological principles: growing food in harmony with nature, rather than against nature. This means using some plants to attract beneficial insects, other plants to loosen the soil, others to fertilize. Growing all of these things together is the way we can wean ourselves off of fossil fuels and actually be able to feed the world in its entirety." - Author Raj Patel on the World Bank International Agricultural Assessment on Science and Technology for Development.
http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=cbd335a05ca74eabbee00f96c7c1f3ec
Posted: 30 June 2008 at 14:46

Doug Vining Radical reforms to set China's farmers free

Thirty years after first setting out on the capitalist road, China's ruling Communist party has approved bold proposals that aim to liberate 700 million peasants from their state-owned land.

The plans, passed yesterday at a plenary session of the party's central committee, could allow farmers to exchange their plots of land or use the sites as collateral for loans. Experts are hoping that the measures will boost rural incomes, improve productivity and help households raise the money required for individuals to get access to the cities.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/oct/13/china
Posted: 13 October 2008 at 11:32
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