Doug Vining Tunecore sells songs for anyone

Tunecore is a digital distribution service that provides administration for a very small amount of money.(US$42 one time fee plus a yearly storage fee).
http://www.tunecore.com/
Posted: 23 November 2007 at 07:50

Doug Vining It's not just music

With all the talk about Amazon’s Kindle, there’s a bigger revolution taking place and those who studied classic literature will be horrified. In Japan, half of the top ten selling works of fiction in the first six months of 2007 were composed on mobile phones.
http://www.techcrunch.com/2007/12/02/in-japan-half-the-top-selling-books-are-written-on-mobile-phones/
Posted: 5 December 2007 at 10:27

Wolfgang Grulke The Economist 10 Jan 2008 confirms trend

"Last year was terrible for the recorded-music majors. The next few years are likely to be even worse"
http://www.economist.com/business/displaystory.cfm?story_id=10498664
Posted: 16 January 2008 at 04:33

Doug Vining Is this the end of the Record label era?

"This morning I purchased the new Radiohead album, In Rainbows, direct from their website. Lots has been written about Radiohead dumping their record company and offering their music direct to the public so I don’t want to harp on the same old stuff but what I do find interesting is the new model which is changing the music world as we know it."
http://justinhartman.com/2007/10/11/is-this-the-end-of-the-record-label-era/
Posted: 16 January 2008 at 21:50

Doug Vining How not to do a FREE calculation, Trent Reznor...

Posted: 16 January 2008 at 21:51

Wolfgang Grulke Radiohead's success with 'free'...

Radiohead allowed fans to download their new album 'In Rainbows' on a pay-what-you-will basis. In teh first month mroe than 1 million people downloaded the album and roughly 40% paid something - an average of US$6 each, netting the band more than US$3 million.

How much would their music company have paid them?

Read more in a wonderful Wired article here: http://www.wired.com/entertainment/music/magazine/16-01/ff_yorke?currentPage=all
Posted: 21 January 2008 at 14:41

Wolfgang Grulke 6 models for the future of the music industry

Posted: 21 January 2008 at 18:34

Wolfgang Grulke Boom in live music and video clips

The Performing Rights Society (In UK) distributed royalties up 1/3 over the year before. The reason is a boom in live music and a deal struck with YouTube and other social networking sites to collect tiny amounts of money when theri clips are played (even 'illegally') by users. Even so, PRS belives it stil represnts only 5% of actual usage.

"Our job is to licence music wherever it's used. I'd prefer to see it through that lens, rather than say 'there are a lot of people stealing music'", says Steve Porter CEO of teh MCPS-PRS Allinace.

Read more at http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2008/apr/21/mediabusiness.digitalmedia?gusrc=rss&feed=technology
Posted: 21 April 2008 at 16:35

Wolfgang Grulke Atlantic Records announces digital boom

Atlantic Records becomes the first music label where digital revenues have overtaken earnings from CD sales.

Read more at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2008/nov/27/digital-music-atlantic-records
Posted: 27 November 2008 at 11:37

Doug Vining Tipping point reached

The music business has finally come to terms with file-sharing, according to executives at the Midem conference in Cannes, but they are scambling to find ways to get paid.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/7837605.stm
Posted: 20 January 2009 at 09:01

Doug Vining The Browser is the new iPod

Gerd Leonhard: The Browser is the new iPod, and the Mobile Application is the new CD
from MIDEM blog
http://midemnetblog.typepad.com/midemnet_blog/2009/06/the-browser-is-the-new-ipod-and-the-mobile-application-is-the-new-cd.html
Posted: 29 June 2009 at 11:35

Wolfgang Grulke The music dinosaurs stir again

It's certainly more than a decade since we 'announced' the death of the traditional music value chain. It looks like the stunned dinosaurs have awakened from their slumber again to 'innovate' - realizing that "wait" is definitely not in the Net Generation's vocab.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "The music dinosaurs stir again") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=3885894d-c118-4774-b864-a2cbecf22d4f
Posted: 17 January 2011 at 10:53

Wolfgang Grulke The state of the music industry

Interesting report from South by South West festival puts the state of the current industry into perspective
A FuturesForum post (titled: "The state of the music industry") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=37d55562-2b92-43ca-9a33-a5a575ea6466
Posted: 18 March 2011 at 11:04

Wolfgang Grulke From digital to LIVE! The next revolution?

Loved this article as a bit of a follow-on to the thinking in our MindBullet published four years ago.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "From digital to LIVE! The next revolution?") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=502e14e0-1630-4b04-a653-de826c0209d1
Posted: 2 December 2011 at 11:05

Wolfgang Grulke What are we to make of the market for music?

It seems that we love our music live, and are falling out of love with recorded music of all kinds?
A FuturesForum post (titled: "What are we to make of the market for music?") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=d7e7c085-b3ec-4392-b345-25d3c56ab631
Posted: 3 January 2012 at 11:23

Wolfgang Grulke Music scenario realised

It's been a gradual but inevitable process from Walkman to iPod, from download to streaming, from high-street 'record' stores to the demise of HMV. This latest bit of news from the UK market should be no surprise!
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Music scenario realised") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=790834be-6ac8-4e4d-8ec4-05c591269656
Posted: 1 June 2012 at 09:49

Neil Jacobsohn Who owns the music?

Its fascinating to watch industrial-age organisations lashing out in their death-throes..such as the music rights organisation in Germany described in this story. Everyone knows that music has become free - except the old-fashioned record industry! They may demand all sorts of fees - but does anyone really believe they will win in the long run? Its time for a new business model, or extinction!
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Who owns the music?") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=392cc83a-a9a9-4396-b84b-c4db0e46c748
Posted: 8 August 2012 at 18:06

Neil Jacobsohn The lessons the music industry can learn from TV

Everyone knows the traditional music industry is in trouble. In the words of Edgar Bronfman, when he was CEO of the Warner Music Group, "The music industry is growing. The record industry is not." But have you noticed that the TV industry is booming, even as the so-called "free' model spreads? Here's a fascinating insight and five lessons that the music industry could learn from television.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "The lessons the music industry can learn from TV") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=cb44f4b7-a590-429b-8536-fe639ae40428
Posted: 6 August 2014 at 11:22
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