Clement Olivier Rent a robot

This not far fetched at all, put yourself back a 100 years and see what menial tasks were done by humans that are now done by machines. This is an evolutionary process, someone must design and manufacture the robot. Thus in order for the wider population to be able to to meet the demand education will have to be improved accordingly. The opperational paradigm will go from the home (castle) year 1800 to the basic factory in town year 1930 to the industrial revolution 1950's to the global economy 1990 to the cyber economy 2005 to a totally global integrated networked economy 2020
Posted: 26 May 2005 at 07:42

Amelia Kennedy Will mines still be around in 80 years?

This article refers to Robots being used in mines in 80 odd years time. Will we not be at the stage by then that mining will be obsolete?
Posted: 26 May 2005 at 07:55

Gavin Chait RE: Will mines still be around in 80 years?

I doubt it. We have mined for more than 4 000 years. The Bronze Age gave way to the Iron Age gave way ... but we still use bronze and iron. Motor cars will still require steel chassis', and every electronic item will still require rare catalysts from the platinum metal group, or stuff like molybdanim, zanthium, chromium and so on - all mined. Mining may change but it will still involve holes being bored into the ground. In reality, the absolute danger and increasing value of human life is likely to speed up automation.
Posted: 28 May 2005 at 12:01

Wolfgang Grulke RE: Will mines still be around in 80 years?

You may be right...this week's MindBullet will feature one such example where nanotech is allowing us to make materials that will replace the use of (currently very expensive) platinum. Who knows what's next! Mining may very well become a fringe industry in the next 100 years as we harness our ability to build designer molecules atom by atom.
Posted: 22 September 2005 at 10:13

Doug Vining Work and jobs in the future

As Glen Hiemstra points out, jobs are an important economic measure, but in the future, it could be an obsolete concept, even an anachronism. It's not just the nature of jobs, moving from a production to a service industry, but the very idea of 'a job' rather than a self-employed economic community.

There are several trends that support this scenario:
3D printing
Robotics and AI
Networks of talent, like 'MBA and Company'
Connectivity that enables telecommuting and job dispersion
The emergence of fractal organisations

Although these trends are likely to be less in evidence, say in China and other emerging economies, the future of work will definitely be different from the 20th century norm. Which is another reason why governments who set themselves the task of creating jobs, might very well be setting themselves up for future failure. Rather create markets, where supply, demand and competition will provide employment, in whatever form makes sense.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Work and jobs in the future") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=8e002afa-8e16-4fe4-bca5-3f8ebd893f12
Posted: 8 June 2011 at 14:40

Anton Musgrave The Dr will see you now...meet Dr Watson

Smart medicine, programmed bedside manners, Dr 'House' like diagnostics, global symptom database and instant accurate answers. These are what awaits us as medicine is disrupted by IBM's Dr Watson smart computer, programmed robots with impeccable manners and remote mobile enabled solutions. A visit to the local general Practitioner will never be the same.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "The Dr will see you now...meet Dr Watson") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=79dcfa05-33cf-4896-a961-f3689c503345
Posted: 8 March 2013 at 19:48

Anton Musgrave Robotic arms controlled by nerves

FDA approves a prosthesis controlled by nerves and electrical pulses. The age of the cyborg approaches! The new opportunities are endless.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Robotic arms controlled by nerves") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=cef38092-6cc8-4a07-bcfe-8e0a59db7c38
Posted: 12 May 2014 at 21:10

Anton Musgrave Get ready for change if you are a professional!

Interesting research suggests that not only will labour be threatened by new technologies, but the professions will also experience disruption. We have been suggesting this for years! Change is the constant and it's going to happen to a professional near you soon.
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Get ready for change if you are a professional!") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=25c40531-1181-41c8-b320-89e88dbe1908
Posted: 16 June 2014 at 08:33

Anton Musgrave Access trumping ownership gains momentum

American spending is shifting...and it may just be the start of a scary story for those companies that rely on people buying more and more stuff! As rampant consumerism seems to be reducing, the economics of a consumer driven society changes everything we know about economics
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Access trumping ownership gains momentum") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=25f1da6b-ab71-4cd7-a427-f72abf7a801f
Posted: 27 October 2014 at 18:15

Anton Musgrave The momentum is growing

Rob Advisors are not new. Yet many still assume this new tech will never displace their personal wealth management roles and relationships. Well, think again...the momentum is building and change is afoot. One HAS to ask the question 'How will I avoid being displaced by a really smart rob advisor?'...and do NOT think the answer is 'my relationships'. remember, Amazon won customer service of the year awards for many consecutive years with nothing more than robo advice based on your buying patterns!
A FuturesForum post (titled: "The momentum is growing") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=2d16c72f-179b-4e38-901b-f9e358aaa3f3
Posted: 1 July 2016 at 10:15

Doug Vining Rent a robot and retire

More than a decade ago we speculated on the ability for robots and automation to enable people to retire earlier, and published a MindBullet along those lines. Now we see this looming concern with robots 'replacing' jobs for people, and the support for basic income for people made redundant by technology. I think I'm inclined to agree with Gerd Leonhard, we are on the cusp of a tipping point which is going to change the fundamental nature of work, retirement and conventional lifestyles. The next few decades are going to experience exponential change!
A FuturesForum post (titled: "Rent a robot and retire") refers to this MindBullet. The full FuturesForum post can be read here: http://www.futureworld.org/PublicZone/FuturesForum/BlogDetails.aspx?PostID=9380bc5f-45be-4d22-a42b-ce3b1b787949
Posted: 6 September 2017 at 09:31
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