Filtered by author: John Stopford

saw-tooth economy
Posted: 20 November 2010

you remind me of a saying [forget the source] that in the history of banking, banks cumulatively have not made a profit, but bankers have been greatly enriched. still true? My own 2020 scenario that I use most has a saw-tooth effect but my argument includes the effects of commodity movements as well. That plus growing complexity will stump us all
John ...

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MindBullet logo BANKS GET FOUND OUT
How they continued to profit in a sawtooth no-growth economy
Dateline: 31 May 2012
Everyone says they're not surprised, but today's revelations in the New York Times and Britain's The Independent have shaken the masters of the financial universe to their core. Their evidence shows that banks have been using their influence with governments to prevent precisely the sorts of reforms that are needed to pull the economy out of its nosedive. We all know that prior to 2007's ...
implications
Posted: 8 July 2010 5 Comments

fascinating thought, though depressing for all the foodies in the world. Any thoughts about the implicaotions for the supply of the food molecles in those sezy cases? Who esle makes money in this new IP world?
John ...

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MindBullet logo FOOD IS NOTHING BUT I.P.
Billionaire digital chef creates the ultimate franchise
Dateline: 12 October 2023
When the first 3D ink-jet printers appeared, they were typically used for high-tech applications that could justify the cost. Leading-edge medicine was an early adopter to print tissues and parts of organs. Then consumer items such as clothing and mobile phones became a commercial reality. Now that 3D printers are in almost all middle-class homes around the world, Wolfgang Puck has been ...
thorium
Posted: 11 February 2010 1 Comment

I had missed the debate on thorium so I am particularly grateful to you for adding to my sense of what issues to track. This one could be huge

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MindBullet logo THORIUM - THE NEW URANIUM
Green, clean and abundant - what more do we want?
Dateline: 11 October 2013
Indian engineers seem to have set the cat among the pigeons of the nuclear energy industry. Yesterday, in a Mumbai press briefing, the newly-formed INEF announced the launch of a small new nuclear reactor fuelled by thorium, making it a commercial reality years earlier than expected. India's growth in nuclear energy has always been constrained due to their limited local reserves of uranium. ...
PC Death
Posted: 3 April 2008 1 Comment

interesting you think this may happen so soon. How do you see the swift evolution of printers, memory and access to the usual ancilliaries in the office environment?
John Stopford ...

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MindBullet logo THE NOTEBOOK PC IS DEAD - LONG LIVE THE SMARTPHONE
Mobile phones become the new portable computer
Dateline: 5 June 2011
Have you noticed how no-one buys a new laptop these days? Just like VCRs and PDAs, the laptop is so last century. Some say that the iPhone was the catalyst for this, but really it was a simple progression to smaller, more portable and powerful technology, that not only does everything last year's laptop does, but more. And it's a phone and camera - and GPS - too! "I used to carry a ...
revenge sites
Posted: 12 January 2008 5 Comments

fascinating thought, but a worrying one too. Allegations may be without foundation and the typical court procedures are too slow to allow corrective action before real damage has been done. How can firms develop defences against such malicious attacks?

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MindBullet logo THE FUTURE OF REVENGE
Facebook and MySpace become first choice
Dateline: 11 August 2009
Revenge used to be so beautifully analog. A jilted lover storms out of her boyfriend's Bahamas hotel, flies back to New York, sprinkles his entire apartment with seeds, activates his emergency sprinkler system and turns the heating to max. The scene when he returns home ten days later can be well imagined. Today, if you want get revenge on a thoughtless lover, a crooked retailer or a myopic ...

Filtered by author: John Stopford