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implications
Posted: 8 July 2010

fascinating thought, though depressing for all the foodies in the world. Any thoughts about the implicaotions for the supply of the food molecles in those sezy cases? Who esle makes money in this new IP world?
John

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Wolfgang Grulke As another foodie - I must say that I see a real positive in this scenario...

Having had a really poor meal in a highly rated restaurant last night it was clear that the apprentices were in charge. With our 3D printers making it, I would be sure that the meal was EXACTLY right, whether I was in the restaurant or at home.
Posted: 9 July 2010 at 19:28
John Stopford I hope this is one of the scenarios the team has pursued with the farmers I was supposed to talk to.

I really do regret missing that, but I had no choice. To my surprise I collapsed with the side effects and delayed revelations of radiation damage to my throat. Home now and beginning to recover.
Stay well
John
Posted: 10 July 2010 at 17:47
Wolfgang Grulke Essentially this kind of thinking threatens the entire value chain between designer and consumer - including farmers, manufacturers, logistics companies etc etc.

The long-term scenario could be bleak for them (or anyone not prepared to change) but the technology is unstoppable and the consumer promise irresistible. W
Posted: 10 July 2010 at 12:45
John Stopford aBSOLUTELY SEE THE nESTLE PARALLEL. But I was more interested in the impact on the farmers and food processors for the varities of food amd control for health, etc, are more challenging than for mere ink or a reasonaly standard coffee bean.

I can aslo see the issue for th cooks and the disintermediation of the chefs and appreentices
John
Posted: 9 July 2010 at 20:40
Wolfgang Grulke Think about the HP printer analogy...today ink-jet printers are being given away for free if you purchase two retail print cartridges.
The print technology is the same, only applied to a third dimension - these 3D printers will cost zero before 2020.
To get back to your question - clearly there is a massive market in the cartridges and the contents therein. Also, this puts the designers in charge of the major profit opportunities - franchising their designs directly to consumers.

That's exactly what Nestle have already done with Nespresso - they have excluded the retailer and many others in the value chain and are controlling the entire 'value network'.
Posted: 9 July 2010 at 19:26
 
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